Federal Debt Collection Procedures Act of 1990

The Federal Debt Collection Procedures Act of 1990 (FDCPA), Title XXXVI of the Crime Control Act of 1990, Pub. L. No. 101-647, 104 Stat. 4789, 4933 (Nov. 29, 1990), is a United States federal law passed in 1990, affecting collection of money owed to the United States government. The FDCPA preempts state remedy laws in most circumstances.[1]

The Act is codified in Chapter 176 of Title 28 of the United States Code, in four subchapters:

  • SUBCHAPTER A—DEFINITIONS AND GENERAL PROVISIONS (§§ 3001–3015)
  • SUBCHAPTER B—PREJUDGMENT REMEDIES (§§ 3101–3105)
  • SUBCHAPTER C—POSTJUDGMENT REMEDIES (§§ 3201–3206)
  • SUBCHAPTER D—FRAUDULENT TRANSFERS INVOLVING DEBTS (§§ 3301–3308)

A provision of the Act states that a person or organization indebted to the United States, against whom a judgment lien has been filed, is ineligible to receive a government grant, including disaster loans.[2]

Noncompliance, depending on severity and frequency, may be punished by fine or even incarceration. FDCPA also allows the federal government to reclaim money that was fraudulently transferred.[1][3]

The Federal Debt Collection Procedures Act of 1990 consists of sections 3601 through 3631 of the Crime Control Act of 1990.

References

  1. ^ Jump up to:ab Della, Mike (January 30, 2013). “Overview of the Federal Debt Collection Procedures Act of 1990”. projectdebtrelief.com. Retrieved April 30, 2013.
  2. ^“13 CFR 123.14 – How does the Federal Debt Collection Procedures Act of 1990 apply?”. vlex.com. January 1, 2011. Archived from the original on May 4, 2013. Retrieved April 30, 2013.
  3. ^Petro, Michael (March 18, 2010). “Federal Debt Collection Procedure Act (“FDCPA”) Allows Government to Collect Defendant’s Restitution From Defendant’s Bookie”. mjpetro.typepad.com. Retrieved April 30, 2013.

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